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Wind Energy Science The interactive open-access journal of the European Academy of Wind Energy
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In this paper, we present a computationally inexpensive model to calculate wind turbine blade fatigue caused by waking and partial waking. The model accounts for steady state on the blade, as well as wind turbulence. The model is fast enough to be used in wind farm layout optimization, which has not been possible with more expensive fatigue models in the past. The methods introduced in this paper will allow for farms with increased energy production that maintain turbine structural reliability.
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https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2020-117
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2020-117

  25 Nov 2020

25 Nov 2020

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal WES.

A Model to Calculate Fatigue Damage Caused by Partial Waking during Wind Farm Optimization

Andrew P. J. Stanleya,b, Jennifer King1, Christopher Bay1, and Andrew Ning2 Andrew P. J. Stanley et al.
  • 1National Renewable Energy Laboratory, National Wind Technology Center, Boulder, CO 80303 USA
  • 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 USA
  • acurrently at: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, National Wind Technology Center, Boulder, CO 80303 USA
  • bformerly at: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 USA

Abstract. Wind turbines in wind farms often operate in waked or partially waked conditions, which can greatly increase the fatigue damage. Some fatigue considerations may be included, but currently a full fidelity analysis of the increased damage a turbine experiences in a wind farm is not considered in wind farm layout optimization because existing models are too computationally expensive. In this paper, we present a model to calculate fatigue damage caused by partial waking on a wind turbine that is computationally efficient and can be included in wind farm layout optimization. The model relies on analytic velocity, turbulence, and loads models commonly used in farm research and design, and captures some of the effects of turbulence on the fatigue loading. Compared to high-fidelity simulation data, our model accurately predicts the damage trends of various waking conditions. We also perform example wind farm layout optimizations with our presented model in which we maximize the annual energy production (AEP) of a wind farm while constraining the damage of the turbines in the farm. The results of our optimization show that the turbine damage can be significantly reduced, more than 10 %, with only a small sacrifice of around 0.07 % to the AEP, or the damage can be reduced by 20 % with an AEP sacrifice of 0.6 %.

Andrew P. J. Stanley et al.

 
Status: open (until 19 Feb 2021)
Status: open (until 19 Feb 2021)
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Andrew P. J. Stanley et al.

Andrew P. J. Stanley et al.

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Short summary
In this paper, we present a computationally inexpensive model to calculate wind turbine blade fatigue caused by waking and partial waking. The model accounts for steady state on the blade, as well as wind turbulence. The model is fast enough to be used in wind farm layout optimization, which has not been possible with more expensive fatigue models in the past. The methods introduced in this paper will allow for farms with increased energy production that maintain turbine structural reliability.
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