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Wind Energy Science The interactive open-access journal of the European Academy of Wind Energy
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The paper analyzes in detail the problem of scaling, considering both the steady state and transient response cases, including the effects of aerodynamics, elasticity, inertia, gravity and actuation. After a general tehoretical analysis of the problem, the article considers two alternative ways of designing a scaled rotor. The two methods are then applied to the scaling of a 10 MW turbine of 180 m of diameter down to three different sizes (54, 27 and 2.8 m).
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2020-66
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2020-66

  30 Mar 2020

30 Mar 2020

Review status: this preprint was under review for the journal WES. A revision for further review has not been submitted.

On the scaling of wind turbine rotors

Helena Canet1, Pietro Bortolotti2, and Carlo L. Bottasso1 Helena Canet et al.
  • 1Wind Energy Institute, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching b. München, Germany
  • 2National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA

Abstract. This article formulates laws for scaling wind turbine rotors. Although the analysis is general, the article primarily focuses on subscaling, i.e. on the design of a smaller size model mimicking a full-scale machine. The present study considers both the steady-state and transient response cases, including the effects of aerodynamic, elastic, inertial and gravitational forces. The analysis reveals the changes to physical characteristics induced by a generic change of scale, indicates which characteristics can be matched faithfully by a sub-scaled model, and states the conditions that must be fulfilled for desired matchings to hold.

Based on the scaling laws formulated here, two different strategies to design scaled rotors are considered: in the first strategy the scaled model is simply geometrically zoomed from the reference full-scale one, while in the second strategy the scaled rotor is completely redesigned in order to match desired characteristics of the full-scale machine.

The two strategies are discussed and compared, highlighting their respective advantages and disadvantages. The comparison considers the scaling of a reference 10-MW wind turbine of about 180 m of diameter down to three different sizes of 54, 27 and 2.8 m. Simulation results indicate that, with the proper choices, several key performance indicators can be accurately matched even by models characterized by significant scaling factors.

Helena Canet et al.

 
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Helena Canet et al.

Helena Canet et al.

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Latest update: 04 Mar 2021
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Short summary
The paper analyzes in detail the problem of scaling, considering both the steady state and transient response cases, including the effects of aerodynamics, elasticity, inertia, gravity and actuation. After a general tehoretical analysis of the problem, the article considers two alternative ways of designing a scaled rotor. The two methods are then applied to the scaling of a 10 MW turbine of 180 m of diameter down to three different sizes (54, 27 and 2.8 m).
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