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Wind Energy Science The interactive open-access journal of the European Academy of Wind Energy
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Wind turbines are often clustered within wind farms. A consequence is that some wind turbines may be exposed to the wakes of other turbines, which reduces their lifetime due to the wake turbulence. Knowledge of the wake is thus important, and we carried out wind tunnel experiments to investigate the wakes. We show how models that describe wakes of bluff bodies can help to improve the understanding of wind turbine wakes and wind turbine wake models, particularly by including a virtual origin.
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https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2021-13
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2021-13

  05 Mar 2021

05 Mar 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal WES.

Investigation of the dissipation in the wake of a wind turbine array

Ingrid Neunaber1,2, Joachim Peinke2, and Martin Obligado3 Ingrid Neunaber et al.
  • 1LHEEA – École Centrale de Nantes, CNRS, 1 Rue de la Noë, 44321 Nantes, France
  • 2Institute of Physics and ForWind, University of Oldenburg, Küpkersweg , 26129 Oldenburg, Germany
  • 3Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LEGI, F-38000, Grenoble, France

Abstract. Within the energy transition, more and more wind turbines are clustered in big wind farms, often offshore. Therefore, an optimal positioning of the wind turbines is crucial to optimize both the annual power production and the maintenance time. Good knowledge of the wind turbine wake and the turbulence within is thus important. However, although wind turbine wakes have been subject to various studies, they are still not fully understood. One possibility to improve the comprehension is to look into the modeling of bluff body wakes. These wakes have been the subject of intensive study for decades, and by means of the scaling behavior of the centerline mean velocity deficit, the nature of the turbulence inside a wake can be classified. In this paper, we introduce the models for equilibrium and non-equilibrium turbulence from classical wake theory as introduced by A. Townsend and W. George, and we test whether the requirements are fulfilled in the wake of a wind turbine. Finally, we apply the theory to characterize the wind turbine wake, and we compare the results to the Jensen and the Bastankhah-Porté-Agel model. We find that the insight into the classical bluff body wake can be used to further improve the wind turbine wake models. Particularly, the classical bluff body wake models perform better than the wind turbine wake models due to the presence of a virtual origin in the scalings, and we demonstrate the possibility of improving the wind turbine wake models by implementing this parameter. We also see how the dissipation changes across the wake which is important to model wakes within wind farms correctly.

Ingrid Neunaber et al.

Status: open (until 16 Apr 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on wes-2021-13', Stefan Emeis, 09 Mar 2021 reply
  • RC1: 'Comment on wes-2021-13', Anonymous Referee #1, 01 Apr 2021 reply

Ingrid Neunaber et al.

Ingrid Neunaber et al.

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Short summary
Wind turbines are often clustered within wind farms. A consequence is that some wind turbines may be exposed to the wakes of other turbines, which reduces their lifetime due to the wake turbulence. Knowledge of the wake is thus important, and we carried out wind tunnel experiments to investigate the wakes. We show how models that describe wakes of bluff bodies can help to improve the understanding of wind turbine wakes and wind turbine wake models, particularly by including a virtual origin.
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