Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2021-157
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2021-157
 
20 Jan 2022
20 Jan 2022
Status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal WES.

Development of a wireless, non-intrusive, MEMS-based pressure and acoustic measurement system for large-scale operating wind turbine blades

Sarah Barber1, Julien Deparday1, Yuriy Marykovskiy1, Eleni Chatzi2, Imad Abdallah2, Gregory Duthé2, Michele Magno3, Tommaso Polonelli3, Raphael Fischer3, and Hanna Müller3 Sarah Barber et al.
  • 1Institute of Energy Technology, Eastern Switzerland University of Applied Sciences, Oberseestrasse 10, 8640 Rapperswil, Switzerland
  • 2Chair of Structural Mechanics and Monitoring, ETH Zürich, Switzerland
  • 3D-ITET, Center for Project-Based Learning, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Abstract. As the wind energy industry is maturing and wind turbines are growing, there is an increasing need for cost-effective monitoring and data analysis solutions to understand the complex aerodynamic and acoustic behaviour of the flexible blades. Published measurements on operating rotor blades in real conditions are very scarce, due to the complexity of the installation and use of measurement systems. However, recent developments in electronics, wireless communication and MEMS sensors are making it possible to acquire data in a cost-effective and energy-efficient way. In this work, therefore, a cost-effective MEMS-based aerodynamic and acoustic wireless measurement system that is thin, non-intrusive, easy to install, low power, and self-sustaining is designed and tested. The results show that the system is capable of delivering relevant results continuously, although work needs to be done on calibrating and correcting the pressure signals, as well as on refining the concept for the attachment sleeve for weather protection in the field. Finally, two methods for using the measurements to provide added value to the wind energy industry are developed and demonstrated: (1) inferring local angle of attack via stagnation point detection using differential pressure sensors near the leading edge, and (2) detecting and classifying leading edge erosion using instantaneous snapshots of the measured pressure fields. On-going work involves field tests on an operating 6 kW wind turbine in Switzerland.

Sarah Barber et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on wes-2021-157', Anonymous Referee #1, 28 Feb 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Sarah Barber, 01 Apr 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on wes-2021-157', Anonymous Referee #2, 11 Mar 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Sarah Barber, 01 Apr 2022
  • EC1: 'Comment on wes-2021-157', Roland Schmehl, 08 Apr 2022
    • AC3: 'Reply on EC1', Sarah Barber, 20 Apr 2022

Sarah Barber et al.

Sarah Barber et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 558 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
369 171 18 558 8 3
  • HTML: 369
  • PDF: 171
  • XML: 18
  • Total: 558
  • BibTeX: 8
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 20 Jan 2022)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 20 Jan 2022)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 526 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 526 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 20 May 2022
Download
Short summary
Aerodynamic and acoustic field measurements on operating large-scale wind turbines are key for the further reduction of the costs of wind energy. In this work, a novel cost-effective MEMS-based aerodynamic and acoustic wireless measurement system that is thin, non-intrusive, easy to install, low power, and self-sustaining is designed and tested.