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Wind Energy Science The interactive open-access journal of the European Academy of Wind Energy
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This paper illustrates two sensor placement optimisation techniques designed for damage detection while taking into account temperature effects. A case study of a glider wing shows that, compared to the normalised method using the temperature label, the linear method that did not require temperature labels provided features that were less sensitive to damage. However, it is cheaper and more convenient to extract temperature-robust features in practical engineering.
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https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2021-53
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2021-53

  07 Jun 2021

07 Jun 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal WES.

On sensor optimisation for structural health monitoring robust to environmental variations

Tingna Wang, David J. Wagg, Keith Worden, and Robert J. Barthorpe Tingna Wang et al.
  • Dynamics Research Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK

Abstract. Structural health monitoring (SHM) is often approached from a statistical pattern recognition or machine learning perspective with the aim of inferring the health state of a structure using data derived from a network of sensors placed upon it. In this paper, two SHM sensor placement optimisation (SPO) strategies that offer robustness to environmental effects are developed and evaluated. The two strategies both involve constructing an objective function (OF) based upon an established damage classification technique and an optimisation of sensor locations using a genetic algorithm (GA). The key difference between the two strategies explored here is in whether any sources of benign variation are deemed to be observable or not. The relative performances of both strategies are demonstrated using experimental data gathered from a glider wing tested in an environmental chamber, with the structure tested in different health states across a series of controlled temperatures.

Tingna Wang et al.

Status: open (until 19 Jul 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Tingna Wang et al.

Tingna Wang et al.

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Short summary
This paper illustrates two sensor placement optimisation techniques designed for damage detection while taking into account temperature effects. A case study of a glider wing shows that, compared to the normalised method using the temperature label, the linear method that did not require temperature labels provided features that were less sensitive to damage. However, it is cheaper and more convenient to extract temperature-robust features in practical engineering.
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