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Wind Energy Science The interactive open-access journal of the European Academy of Wind Energy
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We needed a way to measure wind vectors and turbulence in complex, hard-to-access terrain. We equipped a model helicopter with a standard 3-D ultrasonic anemometer. Due to the hovering capabilities, stationary point measurements are possible. The first measurements were made in flat terrain. A 100 m high stationary wind measuring mast served as reference. The results were investigated in the time domain as well as in the frequency domain.
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2019-81
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-2019-81

  12 Nov 2019

12 Nov 2019

Review status: this preprint was under review for the journal WES but the revision was not accepted.

Flying UltraSonic – A new way to measure the wind

Martin Hofsäß1, Dominique Bergmann2, Jan Denzel2, and Po Wen Cheng1 Martin Hofsäß et al.
  • 1Stuttgart Wind Energy @ Insitute of Aircraft Design (SWE), University of Stuttgart, Allmandring 5b, 70569 Stuttgart Germany
  • 2Insitute of Aircraft Design (IFB), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany

Abstract. Measurements of flow conditions at complex sites that are difficult to install a met mast are expensive and can only be carried out with great effort. Concepts and new measuring methods are needed to evaluate these sites. This article presents an experiment in which an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), more precisely a helicopter, was equipped with a standard 3-D ultrasonic anemometer. This UAV was positioned closed to a meteorological measuring mast and remained stationary at a constant altitude to measure the wind speed components. The data of the UAV were compared with the measurements of an ultrasonic sensor installed on the met mast. The measurements shows a deviation of 0.1 m/s for the horizontal speed. A comparison of the PSDs shows a very good agreement.

Martin Hofsäß et al.

 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Martin Hofsäß et al.

Martin Hofsäß et al.

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Short summary
We needed a way to measure wind vectors and turbulence in complex, hard-to-access terrain. We equipped a model helicopter with a standard 3-D ultrasonic anemometer. Due to the hovering capabilities, stationary point measurements are possible. The first measurements were made in flat terrain. A 100 m high stationary wind measuring mast served as reference. The results were investigated in the time domain as well as in the frequency domain.
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