Articles | Volume 5, issue 4
Wind Energ. Sci., 5, 1359–1374, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-5-1359-2020
Wind Energ. Sci., 5, 1359–1374, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-5-1359-2020

Research article 22 Oct 2020

Research article | 22 Oct 2020

Does the rotational direction of a wind turbine impact the wake in a stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer?

Antonia Englberger et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (21 Nov 2019)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Nov 2019) by Johan Meyers
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 Dec 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (06 Jan 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (14 Feb 2020) by Johan Meyers
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (02 Jul 2020)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 Aug 2020) by Johan Meyers
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (27 Aug 2020)
ED: Publish as is (08 Sep 2020) by Johan Meyers
ED: Publish as is (08 Sep 2020) by Jakob Mann(Chief Editor)
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Short summary
At night, the wind direction often changes with height, and this veer affects structures near the surface like wind turbines. Wind turbines usually rotate clockwise, but this rotational direction interacts with veer to impact the flow field behind a wind turbine. If another turbine is located downwind, the direction of the upwind turbine's rotation will affect the downwind turbine.