Articles | Volume 5, issue 4
Wind Energ. Sci., 5, 1315–1338, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-5-1315-2020
Wind Energ. Sci., 5, 1315–1338, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wes-5-1315-2020

Research article 13 Oct 2020

Research article | 13 Oct 2020

Optimal closed-loop wake steering – Part 1: Conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer conditions

Michael F. Howland et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Michael Howland on behalf of the Authors (13 Jun 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Jul 2020) by Katherine Dykes
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (22 Jul 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Aug 2020) by Katherine Dykes
AR by Michael Howland on behalf of the Authors (10 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Aug 2020) by Katherine Dykes
ED: Publish as is (19 Aug 2020) by Jakob Mann(Chief Editor)

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Michael Howland on behalf of the Authors (09 Oct 2020)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (09 Oct 2020) by Katherine Dykes
Short summary
Wake losses significantly reduce the power production of utility-scale wind farms since all wind turbines are operated in a greedy, individual power maximization fashion. In order to mitigate wake losses, collective wind farm operation strategies use wake steering, in which certain turbines are intentionally misaligned with respect to the incoming wind direction. The control strategy developed is dynamic and closed-loop to adapt to changing atmospheric conditions.